Carbon Black #NOTinMySalon

#NOTinMySalon ๐Ÿ“Œcarbon black made from coal tar and used as a darkening agent. Things have been good in my life for 44 yrs now it is time to ensure the next 44 ๐ŸŽ‰๐ŸŽ‚.


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FOUND IN: Direct Hair Dye, Eyeliner, mascara, nail polish, eye shadow, brush-on-brow, lipstick, blushers, rouge, makeup, and foundation


๐Ÿ“ŒWHAT TO LOOK FOR ON THE LABEL: Carbon black, D & C Black No. 2, acetylene black, channel black, furnace black, lamp black, and thermal black

HEALTH CONCERNS: Cancer (possible), Organ system toxicityMORE...

VULNERABLE POPULATIONS: All people are vulnerable, but especially .... women.

HOW TO AVOID: Read labels and avoid cosmetics and personal care products containing carbon black, D & C Black No. 2, acetylene black, channel black, furnace black, lamp black, and thermal black.

REFERENCES
[1] Federal Register Final Rule- 69 FR 44927 July 28, 2001: Listing of Color Additives Subject to Certification; D & C Black No.2. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Available online. July 14, 2014.
[2] International Carbon Black Association. Available online. July 14, 2014.
[3] Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Carbon Black. Available online. July 14, 2014.
[4] Federal Register Final Rule- 69 FR 44927 July 28, 2001: Listing of Color Additives Subject to Certification; D & C Black No.2. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Available online. July 14, 2014.
[5] Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 November 2009 on cosmetic products. Available online. July 14, 2014.
[6] International Carbon Black Association. Available online. July 14, 2014.
[7] National Toxicology Program. Report on Carcinogens, Twelfth Edition. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Available online. July 18, 2014.
[8] National Toxicity Program (NTP). Available online. 2014.
[9] National Toxicity Program (NTP). Available online. 2014
[10] Weinand F., Statement regarding the presence of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Carbon Black. Evonik Industries, 2009.
[11] NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. Carbon black. Available online. July 11, 2014.
[12] Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Carbon Black. Available online. July 14, 2014.
[13] Chemicals Known to the State to Cause Cancer or Reproductive Toxicity. Available online. July 11, 2014.
[14] IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. Carbon Black evaluation and rationale. vol. 93, pp 190-1.
[15] IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. Carbon Black evaluation and rationale. vol. 93, pp 190-1.
[16] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available online. July 14th.
[17] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Occupational safety and health guideline for carbon black potential human carcinogen. Available online. July 16, 2014.
[18] Ramanakumar A., et al. Risk of lung cancer following exposure to carbon black, titanium dioxide and talc: Results from two case-control studies in Montreal. Int. J. Cancer, vol. 122, pp 183-189, 2008.
[19] IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. Carbon Black evaluation and rationale. vol. 93, pp 190-1.
[20] NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. Carbon black. Available online. July 11, 2014.
[21] Kim H., et al. The impact of intratracheally instilled carbon black on the cardiovascular system of rats: evaluation of blood homocysteine and hyperactivity of platelets. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues, vol. 75, no. 24, pp 1471-83.

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